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Posts tagged “R

Machine Learning Powered Biological Network Analysis

Video

dave_data

Metabolomic network analysis can be used to interpret experimental results within a variety of contexts including: biochemical relationships, structural and spectral similarity and empirical correlation. Machine learning is useful for modeling relationships in the context of pattern recognition, clustering, classification and regression based predictive modeling. The combination of developed metabolomic networks and machine learning based predictive models offer a unique method to visualize empirical relationships while testing key experimental hypotheses. The following presentation focuses on data analysis, visualization, machine learning and network mapping approaches used to create richly mapped metabolomic networks. Learn more at www.createdatasol.com

dave

The following presentation also shows a sneak peak of a new data analysis visualization software, DAVe: Data Analysis and Visualization engine. Check out some early features. DAVe is built in R and seeks to support a seamless environment for advanced data analysis and machine learning tasks and biological functional and network analysis.

As an aside, building the main site (in progress)  was a fun opportunity to experiment with Jekyll, Ruby and embedding slick interactive canvas elements into websites. You can checkout all the code here https://github.com/dgrapov/CDS_jekyll_site.

slides: https://www.slideshare.net/dgrapov/machine-learning-powered-metabolomic-network-analysis


Try’in to 3D network: Quest (shiny + plotly)


I have an unnatural obsession with 4-dimensional networks. It might have started with a dream, but VR  might make it a reality one day. For now I will settle for  3D networks in Plotly.

pp

Presentation: R users group (more)


More: networkly


Network Visualization with Plotly and Shiny


R users: networkly: network visualization in R using Plotly

In addition to their more common uses, networks  can be used as powerful multivariate data visualizations and exploration tools. Networks not only provide mathematical representations of data but are also one of the few data visualization methods capable of easily displaying multivariate variable relationships. The process of network mapping involves using the network manifold to display a variety of other information e.g. statistical, machine learning or functional analysis results (see more mapped network examples).

netmaping

The combination of Plotly and Shiny is awesome for creating your very own network mapping tools. Networkly is an R package which can be used to create 2-D and 3-D interactive networks which are rendered with plotly and can be easily integrated into shiny apps or markdown documents. All you need to get started is an edge list and node attributes which can then be used to generate interactive 2-D and 3-D networks with customizable edge (color, width, hover, etc) and node (color, size, hover, label, etc) properties.


2-Dimensional Network (interactive version)2dnetwork


3-Dimensional Network  (interactive version)

3dnetwork

View all code used to generate the networks above.


Multivariate Data Analysis and Visualization Through Network Mapping


Recently I had the pleasure of speaking about one of my favorite topics, Network Mapping. This is a continuation of a general theme I’ve previously discussed and involves the merger of statistical and multivariate data analysis results with a network.



Over the past year I’ve been working on two major tools, DeviumWeb and MetaMapR, which aid the process of biological data (metabolomic) network mapping.

deviuWeb

DeviumWeb– is a shiny based GUI written in R which is useful for:

  • data manipulation, transformation and visualization
  • statistical analysis (hypothesis testing, FDR, power analysis, correlations, etc)
  • clustering (heiarchical, TODO: k-means, SOM, distribution)
  • principal components analysis (PCA)
  • orthogonal partial least squares multivariate modeling (O-/PLS/-DA)

 
MetaMapR

MetaMapR– is also a shiny based GUI written in R which is useful for calculation and visualization of various networks including:

  • biochemical
  • structural similarity
  • mass spectral similarity
  • correlation


Both of theses projects are under development, and my ultimate goal is to design a one-stop-shop ecosystem for network mapping.


In addition to network mapping,the video above and presentation below also discuss normalization schemes for longitudinal data and genomic, proteomic and metabolomic functional analysis both on a pathway and global level.


As always happy network mapping!

Creative Commons License


Enrichment Network


Enrichment is beyond random occurrence within a category. Networks can represent relationships among variables. Enrichment networks display relationships among variables which are over represented compared to random chance.


Next is  a tutorial for making enrichment networks for biological (metabolomic) data in R using the KEGG database.


Choose Your Own Data Adventure


The question is: can we automate scientific discovery, and what might an interface to such a tool look like.

start


I’ve been experimenting with automating simple and complex data analysis and report generation tasks for biological data and mostly using R and LATEX. You can see some of my progress and challenges encountered in the presentation below. My ultimate goal is to push forward my current state of fill in the generic template to some kind of interactive and dynamic document generator.



While thinking of a fun way of to present the idea of human-guided data analysis and report generation, I thought of the idea for creating a simple choose your adventure story. I decided to adapt the visualization below into an interactive adventure in R which culminates in the writing of your life story using the magic of knitr.

adventure


You can download the story generator, AdventureR, and try it out for yourself. Or take a quick look at some of the possible adventures. Be forewarned some of the story endings are not for the squeamish.

mc 2


On a practical level, I am in the early prototyping phase of what might a similar application look like for metabolomic data. Currently I am struggling to get beyond the linear workflow and to something more interactive, dynamic and adaptive. Nonetheless its is a beauty to behold when at the click of a button an analysis and report can be generated which would otherwise take many hours to days to manually implement. The challenge is to turn the fill in the template style into an adaptive and robust interface which can quickly guide a human domain expert through the modes of information encoded in the data.

report summary


Currently my prototype tools require well defined input templates and flow the data hierarchically down a tree of tasks (e.g. statistics, visualization, functional analysis, clustering), each coming together to generate a mapped network. Right now things are very linear and mostly fill in the template, but still very usefully mimics a set of tasks a bioinformatician might perform. My goal is to adapt the LATEX based text generator into a GUI driven markdown or html based reporting application. With the ultimate goal of increasing the speed and interactivity of the data analysis and interpretation process.

devium 2.0


Tutorials- Statistical and Multivariate Analysis for Metabolomics


2014 winter LC-MS stats courseI recently had the pleasure in participating in the 2014 WCMC Statistics for Metabolomics Short Course. The course was hosted by the NIH West Coast Metabolomics Center and focused on statistical and multivariate strategies for metabolomic data analysis. A variety of topics were covered using 8 hands on tutorials which focused on:

  • data quality overview
  • statistical and power analysis
  • clustering
  • principal components analysis (PCA)
  • partial least squares (O-/PLS/-DA)
  • metabolite enrichment analysis
  • biochemical and structural similarity network construction
  • network mapping


I am happy to have taught the course using all open source software, including: R, and Cytoscape. The data analysis and visualization were done using Shiny-based apps:  DeviumWeb and MetaMapR. Check out some of the slides below or download all the class material and try it out for yourself.

Creative Commons License
2014 WCMC LC-MS Data Processing and Statistics for Metabolomics by Dmitry Grapov is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Special thanks to the developers of Shiny and Radiant by Vincent Nijs.