When you want to get to know and love your data

dplyr Tutorial: verbs + split-apply-combine


At a recent Saint Louis R users meeting I had the pleasure of giving a basic introduction to the awesome dplyr R package. For me, data analysis ubiquitously involves splitting the data based on grouping variable and then applying some function to the subsets or what is termed split-apply-combine. Having personally recently incorporated dplyr into my data wrangling workflows; I’ve found this package’s syntax and performance a joy to work with. My feeling about dplyr are as follows.


Data wrangling without dplyr.

Data wrangling with dplyr.


This tutorial features an introduction to common dplyr verbs and an overview of implementing split-apply-combine in dplyr.

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Some of my conclusions were; not only does dplyr make writing data wrangling code clearer and far faster, the packages calculation speed is also very high (non-sophisticated comparison to base).



The plot above shows the calculation time for 10 replications in seconds (y-axis) for calculating the median of varying number of groups (x-axis), rows (y-facet) and columns (x-facet) with (green line) and without (red line) dplyr.

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2 responses

  1. bigpas

    Hi,

    I think you meant “split-combine-apply” strategy …

    best,

    May 3, 2015 at 8:15 pm

    • You are right, combine is a very important; which I implicitly implied. This was a mistake, now fixed, thank you!

      May 31, 2015 at 1:32 am

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